Unironically Lame

My name is Megan & I'm 18. (Im too lazy to fix my theme)
livebigdreams:

angeleesworld:

rubydat98:

girljanitor:

pixiesteahouse:

queennubian:

kdiamondsz:

fuckyeahdarkgirls:

Jessica White

#TeamBootyStretchmarks

Amen

You guys don’t know how delighted I am to see her with stretch marks. Women have stretch marks and models aren’t exempt. Signal boost for this beauty with tiger stripes.

 literally everyone has stretch marks. that is what actual human bodies look like.

Perfect.

🙌🙌🙌🙌🔥🔥

Yes 😍

livebigdreams:

angeleesworld:

rubydat98:

girljanitor:

pixiesteahouse:

queennubian:

kdiamondsz:

fuckyeahdarkgirls:

Jessica White

#TeamBootyStretchmarks

Amen

You guys don’t know how delighted I am to see her with stretch marks. Women have stretch marks and models aren’t exempt. Signal boost for this beauty with tiger stripes.

 literally everyone has stretch marks. that is what actual human bodies look like.

Perfect.

🙌🙌🙌🙌🔥🔥

Yes 😍

(Source: darkskinwomen, via wanderingempress)

khaleesi:

cleolinda:

shialablunt:

fun fact: Michael Cera asked Rihanna if he could slap her ass for real and she said “you can slap my ass for real if I can slap you in the face for real” and he was like alright. and they did the take like 3 times and Michael was like “you’re not hitting me hard enough do it for real” and then she slapped the fuck out of him and threw off his equilibrium so much he had to go lay down in his trailer for like half an hour lmao and that’s the take they used in the movie with no added sound effects

(via bloomsofjellyfish)

nezua:

THE ONGOING SAGA OF THE FRAGILE WHITE

The Daily Show aired its long awaited segment on the Washington, D.C., NFL team name, in which fans were confronted by Natives on the set.
Before it even aired, the segment proved controversial. The satirical cable television news program had recruited team fans for the segment via Twitter; four were ultimately chosen to participate. But those participants told the Washington Post they felt like they were attacked.
Kelli O’Dell, who says it was unfair for The Daily Show to have her debate Amanda Blackhorse—the lead plaintiff in Blackhorse v. Pro-Football, Inc., which resulted in cancelling six of the team’s trademarks—says she felt like she was placed “in danger.” O’Dell later called authorities to pull The Daily Show tapes she had consented to appear on:

Two days later, O’Dell said she called D.C. police and tried to submit a police report, but authorities told her no crime had been committed.


People want their right to be racist. But the minute they approach facing real life consequences—and mild ones, given what they should expect for years of violence and slurs—look how they shake and cry. Look how they flee and fly to the po-lice, understanding fully the institutional role played by cops.

nezua:

THE ONGOING SAGA OF THE FRAGILE WHITE

The Daily Show aired its long awaited segment on the Washington, D.C., NFL team name, in which fans were confronted by Natives on the set.

Before it even aired, the segment proved controversial. The satirical cable television news program had recruited team fans for the segment via Twitter; four were ultimately chosen to participate. But those participants told the Washington Post they felt like they were attacked.

Kelli O’Dell, who says it was unfair for The Daily Show to have her debate Amanda Blackhorse—the lead plaintiff in Blackhorse v. Pro-Football, Inc., which resulted in cancelling six of the team’s trademarks—says she felt like she was placed “in danger.” O’Dell later called authorities to pull The Daily Show tapes she had consented to appear on:

Two days later, O’Dell said she called D.C. police and tried to submit a police report, but authorities told her no crime had been committed.

People want their right to be racist. But the minute they approach facing real life consequences—and mild ones, given what they should expect for years of violence and slurs—look how they shake and cry. Look how they flee and fly to the po-lice, understanding fully the institutional role played by cops.

(via winkyeyealcoholsuggestion)

humansofnewyork:

"I started working in the fields when I was five. After that, I worked construction for thirty years. Eight years ago, I was between jobs and I wanted to do something useful, so I started going to school. It took me 8 years to get through middle school, because I could only go to classes when work was slow, but I finished with a 9.3 out of 10. Now I’m moving on to high school. The toughest part is Algebra."
(Mexico City, Mexico)

humansofnewyork:

"I started working in the fields when I was five. After that, I worked construction for thirty years. Eight years ago, I was between jobs and I wanted to do something useful, so I started going to school. It took me 8 years to get through middle school, because I could only go to classes when work was slow, but I finished with a 9.3 out of 10. Now I’m moving on to high school. The toughest part is Algebra."

(Mexico City, Mexico)